Tai Chi

Research Spotlight

The databases often return hundreds of medical studies for a single wellness approach. This section summarizes a sampling of five studies – providing just a taste of the available research. These Spotlights were not selected because they are the most favorable or the most recent, but to provide you an introduction to the more extensive research you'll uncover searching the four databases found in the “Research” section of this site.

  • Tai Chi Helps Enhance Cognitive Function in Older Adults
    A 2014 NIH-funded meta-review conducted by the University of York, analyzing 20 studies involving 1,200+ people, found that a tai chi program enhanced cognitive function in older adults, with particularly significant impact on executive functioning in people without significant cognitive impairment. Researchers concluded “tai chi may be an attractive option for people interested in integrated long-term strategies for healthy aging.”
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  • Tai Chi An Effective Strategy for Reducing Falls and Fractures in Older People
    A methodologically strict 2014 Cochrane review analyzed 15 randomized controlled trials (totaling 79,193 participants), to establish which fall prevention interventions are most effective for older people. Researchers concluded tai chi effectively reduced risk of falls and fractures, although not necessarily the rate of falls.
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  • Tai Chi Reduces Blood Pressure, Fall Risk, Depression and Anxiety in Older Adults
    A National Institute for Health Research review of 35 randomized controlled trials (3,799 participants) concluded tai chi and qigong help older adults improve physical function, along with reducing blood pressure, fall risk, depression and anxiety.
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