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Tai Chi

Research Spotlight

The databases often return hundreds of medical studies for a single wellness approach. This section summarizes a sampling of five studies – providing just a taste of the available research. These Spotlights were not selected because they are the most favorable or the most recent, but to provide you an introduction to the more extensive research you'll uncover searching the four databases found in the “Research” section of this site.

  • A Tufts University single-blind, randomized control trial showed that 12 weeks of Tai Chi reduced pain - and improved physical function, self-efficacy, depression, and health-related quality of life - for knee osteoarthritis patients.
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  • A Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (US) single-blind randomized controlled trial (100 outpatients) showed that 12 weeks of Tai Chi improved quality of life, mood, and exercise self-efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure.
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  • A National Institute for Health Research review of 35 randomized controlled trials (3,799 participants) concluded Tai Chi (and Qi gong) help older adults improve physical function and reduce blood pressure, fall risk, depression and anxiety.
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  • A Chungnam National University (Korea) quasi-experimental study revealed that a 6-month Tai Chi program positively impacted glucose control, diabetic self-care activities, and quality of life in patients with Type 2 diabetes.
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  • A Cochrane review(4 studies testing 202 people)concluded that "silver" level evidence exists that Tai Chi improves ankle, hip and knee range of motion for rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, it didn’t improve joint tenderness, grip strength or the number of swollen joints.
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