Wellnessevidence_logo3final

Nutritional Counseling

Research Spotlight

The databases often return hundreds of medical studies for a single wellness approach. This section summarizes a sampling of five studies – providing just a taste of the available research. These Spotlights were not selected because they are the most favorable or the most recent, but to provide you an introduction to the more extensive research you'll uncover searching the four databases found in the “Research” section of this site.

  • A National Institute of Health Research systematic review (29 randomized controlled trials) concludes nutritional counseling improves dietary habits, and more intensive counseling aimed at higher risk patients produces even larger changes in behavior.
    Access this research on Nutritional Counseling
  • A Cleveland Clinic (US) study (894 participants) found cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic children can be significantly reduced with screening and nutritional counseling.
    Access this research on Nutritional Counseling
  • A University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands) randomized trial (134 adults) found nutritional counseling resulted in modest weight-loss in overweight adults, which was sustained up to 12 months.
    Access this research on Nutritional Counseling
  • A Glostrup University Hospital (Denmark) randomized trial (involving 60 doctors and 339 patients) - comparing the effectiveness of nutritional counseling from a doctor (GP) vs. a dietician - found that weight loss was greater in the dietician group, while the reduction of cardiovascular risk scores was higher for GP group, and for obese patients, long-term nutritional counseling by a dietician was superior.
    Access this research on Nutritional Counseling
  • A controlled study by Universität Innsbruck (Austria) revealed that combining exercise and nutritional counseling led to significant weight loss in obese children, even without caloric reduction.
    Access this research on Nutritional Counseling